Diamond Peaks Mountain Bike Patrol

04/2/20 COVID-19 Pandemic Patrolling Update: We have received notification from the various land agencies that we patrol for of restrictions on patrolling during the COVID-19 pandemic.  While you are still allowed to go ride your bikes and be good “trail citizens”, the following restrictions on patrolling are in place until further notice:

  1. Update: Fort Collins Natural Areas: We got feedback that “stealth” patrolling is allowed. This means that we are not allowed to identify ourselves as patrollers (no placards or jerseys, etc.), so as to discourage interaction with trail users.  We are required to maintain the 6′ social distancing rules while patrolling and are also encouraged to patrol in small groups, to limit the possibility of community spread. You can still log your patrols.

  2. Larimer County Open Spaces: Clarification is pending, but for now, “stealth” patrolling is allowed.  This means that we are not allowed to identify ourselves as patrollers (no placards or jerseys, etc.), so as to discourage interaction with trail users.  We are required to maintain the 6′ social distancing rules while patrolling and are also encouraged to patrol in small groups, to limit the possibility of community spread. You can still log your patrols.

  3. USFS: Patrolling is prohibited, but you can still ride on USFS properties as long as you observe the social distancing protocols.

  4. Lory State Park: The Park is open and “stealth” patrolling is allowed. This means that we are not allowed to identify ourselves as patrollers (no placards or jerseys, etc.), so as to discourage interaction with trail users.  We are required to maintain the 6′ social distancing rules while patrolling and are also encouraged to patrol in small groups, to limit the possibility of community spread.  You can still log your patrols.

  5. Update: Wyoming State Parks: The Parks (Gowdy and Glendo) are open and “stealth” patrolling is allowed. This means that we are not allowed to identify ourselves as patrollers (no placards or jerseys, etc.), so as to discourage interaction with trail users.  We are required to maintain the 6′ social distancing rules while patrolling and are also encouraged to patrol in small groups, to limit the possibility of community spread.  You can still log your patrols.

Also, a quick note…if you have not completed all of your requirements to be a Patroller, including paying Overland dues, you cannot represent yourself as a DPMBP Patroller when out riding.  I will be contacting you individually to let you know your status within the next week.

We understand that this is a difficult time and getting out to ride is one of the things that will help keep us a little more sane.  If you do go out to ride, please be sure to follow the guidelines to limit the spread of COVID-19.  Once we are past this, I am sure there will be a lot of pent-up desire to ride, so let’s look forward to when we can ride and patrol as usual and plan on making the rest of the season beyond that a great one!


Joe & Tami 1

Diamond Peaks Mountain Bike Patrol is a service of Overland Mountain Bike Association. Some might even call it the soul of our organization, since DPMBP is where it all started.

Why Become a Patroller?

You love mountain biking and you care about helping other mountain biking enthusiasts to enjoy the trails as much as you do. Certified Mountain Bike Patrollers work to assist others on the trails in medical and or mechanical emergencies. You will have the opportunity to educate trail users of proper etiquette using IMBA’s Rules of the Trail, maintain contact with local land agencies regarding trail conditions or incidents, and work side by side, ride by ride, with Outreach members on advocacy and trail work.

Questions or comments, please contact our Patrol Director, Pete Skram at: patrol@overlandmtb.org


When you become a Certified Mountain Bike Patroller, you’ll receive:TKMBD - Carrie

  • The opportunity to make sure trail-users are safe and have up-to-date info regarding trails
  • The opportunity to communicate with Land Agencies about trail conditions/concerns
  • The opportunity to meet once a month and talk about mountain biking
  • That warm tingly sensation of knowing that you belong to a community of people who work to keep mountain biking alive and well in our region
  • A great excuse to get out and ride and help others.

Requirements for Certified Patrol Members:

  • Be committed to being a good trail citizen and responsible rider (https://www.imba.com/ride/imba-rules-of-the-trail)
  • Have a serviceable bike and wear a helmet
  • Complete American Heart Association Certified First Aid and CPR Training
  • Complete “Good Host’ Training with the City of Fort Collins and the USFS
  • Pass a background check with the City of Fort Collins.
  • Complete Two Training Rides with another Certified Patroller
  • Be a minimum of 18 years of age. (Families, however, may sign a waiver for their underage children to be out on patrol.)
  • Demonstrate basic bicycle mechanic skills. (Change a flat, fix a broken chain, etc. Stuff that will help someone get back to the trailhead if necessary)

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Patrol Volunteer Agreement Forms:

1. USFS Patrol Volunteer Agreement (patroller needs to complete section on page 2)

2. USFS Hazardous Tree Protocol Certification

3. Larimer County Patrol Volunteer Agreement